Democracy in Japan

Authors

  • Tetsundo Iwakuni Former Member of the Japanese House of Representatives, Visiting Professor, University of Virginia (USA), Visiting Professor, Nankai University (PRC), Professor Emertis, Dongseo University (POK), Former Advisor, Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) Policy Research Council

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.5564/mjia.v0i18.74

Abstract

Brief Background

Most people seem to be under the impression that democracy was introduced to Japan at the end of World War II. Well – not so much introduced as imposed upon the Japanese people by the Allied Forces.

While this may be true to some extent, it is important to note that the seeds of democracy already existed in Japanese society in the early 20th century, which explains the relative ease of transition to democratic processes and receptivity of democratic institutions.

Another factor that facilitated the transition from an ultranationalist, militarist government was the retention of the imperial system. Although now mostly symbolic, it nevertheless had a stabilizing effect for the Japanese people at a time of great turbulence and change in the aftermath of war.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5564/mjia.v0i18.74

Mongolian Journal of International Affairs No.18 2013: 118-122

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Published

2013-08-13

How to Cite

Iwakuni, T. (2013). Democracy in Japan. Mongolian Journal of International Affairs, (18), 118–122. https://doi.org/10.5564/mjia.v0i18.74

Issue

Section

Democracy in Asia